Central Saint Martins Jewellery 2014 - II

Here we feature the second in a four part series of short interviews with designers from the Central Saint Martins Jewellery 2014 show, including in this article – Gianna Pak Yung Chan, Ioanna Souflia, Jessie Seo and Junko Kurihara.

For the second year, we have been working with the students designers of the Central Saint Martins Jewellery Design course. We will be awarding a Winterson Prize to one of the students for 'The Best Use of Pearls' at Jewellery Awards Evening on 19th June.

Read about some of the other designers in Part I, Part III and Part IV of our interviews here. Discover the Winner of the Winterson Prize 2014 here.

GIANNA PAK YUNG CHAN

Gianna Pak Yung Chan

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

My name is Gianna Chan. I enjoy working with pearls and combine them with different types of material to explore new possibilities.

What was the inspiration for this collection?

In my final collection, I mainly use rope to play with the line and knots. The inspiration of my collection is from Japanese Bondage. Japanese bondage involves the interaction between ropes and knots on body to emphasis the body shape of female.

What have you discovered about working with pearls?

The uniqueness of each pearl brings out the differences of individual jewellery. This uniqueness can be differentiated by size, shape and texture etc. Each pearl may lend its character to the design with different settings, like twisting pearls strings to the knots. The roughness of rope and the smoothness of a pearl creates an interesting combination.

What is it that makes a piece of jewellery a design classic?

Historically, there are many paintings that included pearl jewellery. Photographs of Louise Brookes with simple long string of pearls shows an elegance of women that is memorable.

Classic design in jewellery often comes from the combination of using traditional technique with creativity. In my collection, the traditional way of stringing pearls with new expression in rope shows feminine and elegance in a classic style.

What is your most treasured piece of jewellery?

My parents gave me a jade pendant after my birth.

Name one jewellery toolbox essential that you can’t live without.

My hands! Tools are the integrated version of my hands.

IOANNA SOUFLIA

Ioanna Souflia

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am former law graduate who decided to challenge herself and enter the creative world through jewellery. I am amazed by the infinite possibilities of jewellery design and drawn to the challenge of expressing one self through such an object.

What was the inspiration for this collection?

The starting points for this collection were my contrasting fields of studies: law and jewellery. Contrasting elements; linear patterns and sculptural forms; black and white; contemporary materials such as marble and traditional materials such as metal and the pearl brought together. A synthesis of opposing elements resulting to a cohesive union.

What have you discovered about working with pearls?

The ability of the pearl to stand out but at the same time to adapt to the design; its dual character, a classic, fine jewellery material which can be incorporated to a more contemporary piece of jewellery; for me this is what makes pearls timeless.

What’s next for you after CSM?

My goal after CSM will be to start and establish my own brand.

What is your most treasured piece of jewellery?

My most treasured piece of jewellery would be the first ring I ever made. It signals the beginning of my creative journey in the jewellery world.

What’s your motto?

Be persistent; this is what I have been telling myself from the very moment I decided to become a jewellery designer.

JESSIE SEO

Jessie Seo

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am Jessie Seo. I am a final year student at Central Saint Martins. My designs were derived by my fascination of nature.

What was the inspiration for this collection?

My imagination started when looking at large pieces of dark bark that had really interesting textures. I wanted to manipulate the textures of the wood and explore the depth and texturized images engraved on the wood. The idea of engraving flowers on the wood has been the subject of my fascinatation with the material of wood.

I found an artist named Karl Blossfeldt. His black and white photographs of a flower’s buds, shoots and stems were magnified and their shapes were amazing. I was drawn to the images of his works and inspired me to engrave them immediately on the black ebony wood.

Combining natural material into jewelry gives me an emotion of wearing nature. My collection is a night garden. The beauty of blackness shines through moonlight that gently rests on this night garden. I have used the pearls to picture the moonlight on the black garden.

What have you discovered about working with pearls?

I have discovered that pearls are very delicate and it has very oriental and natural beauty that makes the jewelry’s beauty to its most height.

What’s next for you after CSM?

An MA in Italy!

Name one jewellery toolbox essential that you can’t live without.

Drill bits!

Name your favourite place for design in London.

London Zoo.

JUNKO KURIHARA

Junko Kurihara

 

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I am 23 years old and am from Japan.

What was the inspiration for this collection?

My inspiration came from the blurred images and eyesight, that occurs without wearing contact lenses or glasses.

What have you discovered about working with pearls?

That a natural pearl may have a beautiful colour that people are not able to create.

Who could you imagine wearing your jewellery?

My jewellery is designed for everyone who wants to wear it, but I would imagine particularly for ladies aged 40-50 years old.

What is your most treasured piece of jewellery?

An 18 carat gold ring that I bought with my first salary.

What’s your motto?

Be creative!